Corporate

  • July 12, 2024

    Law360 Names 2024's Top Attorneys Under 40

    Law360 is pleased to announce the Rising Stars of 2024, our list of 158 attorneys under 40 whose legal accomplishments belie their age.

  • July 12, 2024

    Engineering Firms Ink $26.5M Deals To End 'No-Poach' Claims

    Four engineering firms have agreed to shell out a total of $26.5 million, while a fifth has pledged to cooperate, to settle a proposed class action alleging they conspired to restrict hiring through "no-poach" agreements, leaving RTX Corp. unit Pratt & Whitney as the sole defendant, plaintiffs told a Connecticut federal judge on Friday.

  • July 12, 2024

    Del. Court Finds 1 Of 6 Bylaws Invalid But All Unenforceable

    Only one of six contested advance-notice bylaws that Florida pharma company AIM Immuno Tech Inc. adopted in response to an activist shareholder's proxy contest is actually invalid but none remain enforceable because the board adopted them primarily to thwart the shareholder's challenge, Delaware's Supreme Court has ruled.

  • July 12, 2024

    Loper Bright Is Shaking Up Dozens Of Regulatory Fights

    In the two weeks since the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Chevron deference, the landmark decision has emerged as a live issue in dozens of administrative challenges, with federal courts already pausing agency regulations expanding LGBTQ+ rights in education and healthcare and with a wave of parties seeking to use the new decision to win their cases.

  • July 12, 2024

    Conn. Health Staffing Co. Co-Owner Drops Partnership Suit

    The co-owner of a Connecticut healthcare staffing company has withdrawn a lawsuit against a co-owner accused of plundering from the partnership, a move that leaves untested a sole dissolution claim left standing by a judge who dismissed all other causes of action between the parties earlier this year.

  • July 12, 2024

    Employment Authority: The Resistance To Child Labor Rules

    Law360 Employment Authority covers the biggest employment cases and trends. Catch up this week with how a group of Republican states are pushing back on the U.S. Department of Labor's efforts to tackle unlawful child labor, how state-level pay transparency laws can make it easier for businesses to collect wage data and the five cases to keep an eye on that can affect labor law.

  • July 12, 2024

    BNSF Puts Up $426M To Stay Tribe's Win Pending Appeal

    BNSF Railway Co. on Friday asked a federal judge to approve a $426 million security bond and to stay enforcement of a nearly $400 million judgment for trespassing across a Washington tribe's territory, while the railroad appeals.

  • July 12, 2024

    Apollo Seeks Chancery Toss Of Stockholder Pact Challenge

    Pointing in part to a pending Delaware law that would allow corporate directors to cede some board powers to big stockholders, Apollo Global Management Inc. has asked a Delaware vice chancellor to dismiss a suit challenging its own stockholder pact.

  • July 12, 2024

    Greenberg Traurig Taps M&A Atty To Head UAE Corp. Team

    Greenberg Traurig LLP has named a former Clyde & Co. partner with extensive experience in the Middle East as a shareholder and head of its United Arab Emirates corporate practice, working out of the firm's UAE and Saudi Arabia outposts.

  • July 12, 2024

    Judge Questions Zuckerberg's Bid To Dodge Liability In MDL

    A California federal judge voiced doubt Friday about Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg's arguments for axing corporate-officer liability claims from multidistrict litigation over the allegedly addictive designs of social media, saying that while many CEOs are hands-off, "it's not clear to me that Mr. Zuckerberg is one of them."

  • July 12, 2024

    Conn. Justices Say Town Can Tax Hospital's Property

    Personal property of a Connecticut hospital owned by Hartford HealthCare is taxable, the state Supreme Court said Friday, reversing a trial court opinion and ruling that Hartford's acquisition of the hospital negated a tax exemption for charitable entities.

  • July 12, 2024

    Real Estate Recap: Mall Makeovers, Military Land, Fundraising

    Catch up on this week's key developments by state from Law360 Real Estate Authority, including one Big Four retail leader's take on mall potential, the U.S. Treasury's increasing scrutiny of land deals with national security concerns, and a midyear look at private real estate fundraising trends.

  • July 12, 2024

    Ex-Slync CEO Gets 20 Years After Wire Fraud Conviction

    The founder of shuttered supply chain management software company Slync has received a 20-year prison sentence involving a pair of partially concurrent sentences after a Texas jury in January handed down convictions on wire fraud and other claims over prosecutors' allegations that he drained $25 million out of his company's bank accounts.

  • July 12, 2024

    No Injury In Suit Targeting J&J Asset Shuffles, Talc Unit Says

    Johnson & Johnson wants a New Jersey federal judge to toss a proposed class action alleging that the company has tried to intentionally prevent talc claimants from getting their day in court through a scheme of fraudulent corporate transactions, arguing that the cancer patients failed to show how any of the challenged transactions left it unable to pay its talc claims.

  • July 12, 2024

    AIG Says Ex-Execs Who Started Rival Co. Stole Trade Secrets

    Insurance giant American International Group is accusing three of its former senior executives of unlawfully using confidential company information to launch a startup New Jersey insurance company.

  • July 12, 2024

    Zimmer Biomet Owes Despite Expired Patents, 7th Circ. Says

    Zimmer Biomet Holdings shouldn't have stopped paying royalties on knee replacement devices it developed using an orthopedic surgeon's various patents after those patents expired, the Seventh Circuit said Friday, backing a lower court's decision affirming an arbitration ruling in favor of the surgeon's estate.

  • July 12, 2024

    Steris Infringing 'AST' Trademark, Medical Equipment Co. Says

    Medical supply company Steris Corp. is allegedly infringing the "AST" trademark of a Washington engineering and medical equipment firm, according to a complaint filed Friday in Washington federal court.

  • July 12, 2024

    American Airlines Pilot Pushes For $16M Win After ERISA Trial

    An American Airlines pilot urged a Texas federal court to make the airline cough up nearly $16 million following a June bench trial in a retirement savings class action, arguing the company breached its fiduciary duties to its retirement plan by focusing too heavily on environmental and social factors in investments.

  • July 12, 2024

    GC Cheat Sheet: The Hottest Corporate News Of The Week

    General counsel at companies involved in environmental litigation scored victories and suffered some setbacks this week, including the dismissal of a Baltimore city suit seeking climate damages as well as Marathon Oil's record-setting $241.5 million Clean Air Act settlement.

  • July 12, 2024

    Chancery Approves $19.5M Convey-TPG Settlement

    Former shareholders of Convey Health Solutions Inc. won Delaware Chancery Court approval Friday of a $19.5 million cash settlement to resolve a class challenge to the healthcare technology company's $1.1 billion take-private acquisition by TPG Inc., with $3.88 million going to class attorneys after expenses.

  • July 12, 2024

    Wayfair Says Contractor On 1st Megastore Stiffed Vendors

    Online retailer Wayfair LLC says the company it hired to oversee the build-out of its first "large-format" brick and mortar location failed to pay multiple subcontractors on the project, forcing Wayfair to pay the subcontractors directly to ensure that the store opened on time, according to a complaint filed Friday.

  • July 12, 2024

    FINRA's Remote Inspection Pilot Met With Praise, Caution

    The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority's new pilot program for remote inspections of broker-dealers has earned praise from attorneys, who say the measures accommodate the reality of remote work routines, but they're waiting to see how the chips fall on questions including the adequacy of the regulator's data security measures.

  • July 12, 2024

    Midyear Report: Taking Stock Of Sports Betting Enforcement

    The first six months of 2024 saw no shortage of action in the enforcement of sports betting rules, highlighted by a bombshell fraud case ensnaring baseball's biggest star and a messy betting scandal that saw a fringe NBA rotation player banned from the game for life.

  • July 12, 2024

    Cadwalader Adds Ex-Simpson Thacher Corporate Atty In NY

    Cadwalader Wickersham & Taft LLP announced the hiring of an executive compensation and employee benefits partner in New York with previous stops at Simpson Thacher and the Blackstone Group.

  • July 12, 2024

    AT&T Reveals Breach Of 'Nearly All' Users' Wireless Records

    AT&T disclosed Friday that hackers had downloaded phone call and text message records belonging to "nearly all" the telecom giant's wireless customers at various times between May 2022 and early last year, although the company stressed that the breached data did not include the contents of these communications or appear to be publicly available.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    After Chevron: 7 FERC Takeaways From Loper Bright

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    Following the U.S. Supreme Court's overturning of the Chevron doctrine, it's likely that the majority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's orders will not be affected, but the commission has nonetheless lost an important fallback argument and will have to approach rulemaking more cautiously, says Norman Bay at Willkie Farr.

  • Series

    After Chevron: USDA Rules May Be Up In The Air

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    The Supreme Court's end of Chevron deference may cause more lawsuits against U.S. Department of Agriculture regulations, like the one redefining "unfair trade practices" under the Packers and Stockyards Act, or a new policy classifying salmonella as an adulterant in certain poultry products, says Bob Hibbert at Wiley.

  • Series

    In The CFPB Playbook: Making Good On Bold Promises

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision upholding the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's funding structure in the second quarter cleared the way for the bureau to resume a number of high-priority initiatives, and it appears poised to charge ahead in working toward its aggressive preelection agenda, say Andrew Arculin and Paula Vigo Marqués at Blank Rome.

  • Series

    After Chevron: Creating New Hurdles For ESG Rulemaking

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's Loper Bright decision, limiting court deference to agencies' statutory interpretations, could have significant impacts on the future of ESG regulation, creating new hurdles for agency rulemaking around these emerging issues, and calling into question current administrative actions, says Leah Malone at Simpson Thacher.

  • Opinion

    States Should Loosen Law Firm Ownership Restrictions

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    Despite growing buzz, normalized nonlawyer ownership of law firms is a distant prospect, so the legal community should focus first on liberalizing state restrictions on attorney and firm purchases of practices, which would bolster succession planning and improve access to justice, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • Navigating The Extent Of SEC Cybersecurity Breach Authority

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's broad reading of its authority under Section 13(b)(2)(B) of the Securities Exchange Act in the R.R. Donnelley and SolarWinds actions has ramifications for companies dealing with cybersecurity breaches, but it remains to be seen whether the commission's use of the provision will withstand judicial scrutiny, say attorneys at Sullivan & Cromwell.

  • Series

    After Chevron: Rethinking Agency Deference In IP Cases

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent overturning of Chevron deference could make it simpler to challenge the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s proposed rule on terminal disclaimers and U.S. International Trade Commission interpretations, says William Milliken at Sterne Kessler.

  • Best Text Practices In Light Of Terraform's $4.5B Fraud Deal

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    Text messages were extremely important in a recent civil trial against Terraform Labs, leading to a $4.5 billion settlement, so litigants in securities fraud cases need to have robust mobile data policies that address the content and retention of messages, and the obligations of employees to allow for collection, say Josh Sohn and Alicia Clausen at Crowell & Moring.

  • Series

    Solving Puzzles Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Tackling daily puzzles — like Wordle, KenKen and Connections — has bolstered my intellectual property litigation practice by helping me to exercise different mental skills, acknowledge minor but important details, and build and reinforce good habits, says Roy Wepner at Kaplan Breyer.

  • Series

    After Chevron: Uniform Tax Law Interpretation Not Guaranteed

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    The loss of Chevron deference will significantly alter the relationship between the IRS, courts and Congress when it comes to tax law, potentially precipitating more transparent rulemaking, but also provoking greater uncertainty due to variability in judicial interpretation, say Michelle Levin and Carneil Wilson at Dentons.

  • Series

    After Chevron: Environmental Law May Face Hurdles

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling overturning Chevron deference could prove to be as influential as the original 1984 decision, with far-reaching implications for U.S. environmental laws, including rendering recently promulgated regulations more vulnerable to challenges, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Opinion

    'Trump Too Small' Ruling Overlooks TM Registration Issues

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision last month in Vidal v. Elster, which concluded that “Trump Too Small” cannot be a registered trademark as it violates a federal prohibition, fails to consider modern-day, real-world implications for trademark owners who are denied access to federal registration, say Tiffany Gehrke and Alexa Spitz at Marshall Gerstein.

  • Texas Ethics Opinion Flags Hazards Of Unauthorized Practice

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    The Texas Professional Ethics Committee's recently issued proposed opinion finding that in-house counsel providing legal services to the company's clients constitutes the unauthorized practice of law is a valuable clarification given that a UPL violation — a misdemeanor in most states — carries high stakes, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • Why High Court Social Media Ruling Will Be Hotly Debated

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    In deciding the NetChoice cases that challenged Florida and Texas content moderation laws, what the U.S. Supreme Court justices said about social media platforms — and the First Amendment — will have implications and raise questions for nearly all online operators, say Jacob Canter and Joanna Rosen Forster at Crowell & Moring.

  • Series

    After Chevron: Good News For Gov't Contractors In Litigation

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    The net result of the U.S. Supreme Court's decision overturning Chevron deference is that individuals, contractors and companies bringing procurement-related cases against the government will have new pathways toward success, say Joseph Berger and Andrés Vera at Thompson Hine.

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